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Woodstock Mansion: A 19th Century Plantation in Kentucky

Woodstock Mansion: A 19th Century Plantation in Kentucky

by Meghan White.

 
Ah, that sweet, old fashioned charm of yesteryear. No where is it more apparent than in the beautiful old homes found throughout the American South. Join Meghan as she shares her favorite Southern real estate finds.
 
Woodstock Mansion, a c. 1830 estate, sits on almost eight acres of green space less than one hour from Nashville, Tennessee in Trenton, Kentucky. The house was built in several campaigns, creating a unique architectural style. These campaigns and subsequent renovations show that the house and estate was much beloved to the nine owners who took care of Woodstock.
 

 

6338 Clarksville Rd, Trenton, KY 42286

 
Asking Price: $899,000
Circa 1830
 
Woodstock Mansion is available for purchase for the first time in the 21st century. Built in Todd County, Kentucky in 1830, this 8301 sq. ft. hm resides on 7.5 acres. Approx 45 minutes from Nashville, this National Historic Register home would be the perfect Country Estate getaway. It would also be ideal for a Writer’s retreat, Bed and Breakfast, Event Space or Tea Room.
 
Source: Village Real Estate Services
 
 
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When first constructed, the brick house was part of a 3,000-acre plantation. The first owners named their estate “Woodstock” in part from the 1826 publication by Sir Walter Scott, called
Woodstock. The house was enlarged thirty years later, with the additions of a dining room, two more bedrooms, a ballroom, and the spiral staircase. The staircase took two years to complete, and the craftsman lived with the family during that time.
 
In the 1850s an “el” was added to accommodate the family’s children, grandparents, and a tutor who lived on the estate. In the 1940s the house went through another renovation, this time on the upper level. One bedroom was divided into two, while a room to the west became a single bedroom with a bathroom and office. In the 1970s the infrastructure of the house was updated; fireplaces were converted to coal burning, and the electrical and plumbing systems were improved.
 
 
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The interior contains beautiful Federal-era details, including the 9-over- 9 double-hung- sash windows, Flemish bond brickwork (one of the most expensive patterns to build in), the transom above the entryway, and a gable roof. The windows are surrounded by original woodwork from both the 1830 and 1851 building campaigns. Impressive stone lintels adorn the house’s windows. The ballroom has wide windows that provide an entrance to the attached porch. It was perfect for additional dance space, though today the porch overlooking the front facade will give Woodstock’s new owners a beautiful view of their estate and Kentucky’s rolling greens.
 
 
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The property includes several historic outbuildings, such as a smokehouse that dates to 1849. It also has a stable and carriage house from an unknown date. Ten cedar trees lining the driveway that you can see today were planted by the original owner. Woodstock is an impressive estate that would be perfect for a family or as a retreat space.
 
 
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It was the antebellum home of the Charles Nicholas Minor Meriwether plantation. Built in Todd County, Kentucky in 1830, their manor house served as the heart of the 3000-acre plantation. In 1860, the family began the second addition to Woodstock. This addition included a large dining room, 2 bedrooms, large hall, a ballroom and a spiral staircase. The ballroom was added on that floor. The spiral staircase was hand carved by an English craftsman, who resided in New York. While completing the staircase, he lived with the family for 2 years.
 
 
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Noted for its early horse racing events, Woodstock horses were provided for several Civil War generals. General Albert Sidney Johnston was killed at the Battle of Shiloh on a Woodstock horse, Fire-eater. The equestrian statue is located at the Tennessee tomb in Metairie Cemetery in New Orleans. Woodstock has been showcased in various books and news articles locally and nationally throughout the years. The estate is a Kentucky Landmark and is listed on the National Historic Register by the U.S. Department of the Interior. With only nine owners in Its 186 years, it is a crown jewel for history buffs or writers.
 
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MeghanAUTHOR MEGHAN WHITE
Meghan is from the suburbs of Atlanta, Georgia. She studied history and art history at Elon University in North Carolina before moving to Charleston, South Carolina to earn her Master of Science in Historic Preservation from Clemson University & College of Charleston’s joint graduate program. She loves living in a city where tangible history is everywhere. Charleston is also the first city in which she can claim a historic property home—she currently lives in a converted stable and carriage house from the early nineteenth century. When not battling the humidity and palmetto bugs, she works at the Aiken Rhett House, a historic house museum with a “preserve as found” philosophy. Meghan is enthusiastic about advocating for the architectural and historical importance of auxiliary structures after uncovering the likely original appearance of George Washington’s horse stable at Mount Vernon through an internship and her Master’s thesis. She hopes one day to own a Queen Anne fixer-upper where she can live her days reading in its turret.

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